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But then his mentor asked him to attend a weekend conference at DARPA.White knew it as the alphabet soup that spelled out Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Pentagon's scientific-innovation department, the folks who brought you bionic exoskeletons, night vision, the M16, agent orange, GPS, stealth technology, weather satellites, and the Internet.Before Chris White could help disrupt Jihadi finance networks, crush weapons markets, and bust up sex-slave rings with search tools that mine the dark Web, he first had to figure out how to stop himself from plummeting through the open gun door of a banking Black Hawk helicopter. Slight and lanky and 28, White felt Dukakis-ridiculous in his unwieldy body armor and bulbous helmet with "Dr. White was on his way to a forward operating base outside Kabul headquarters, as part of a secret intelligence cell to help confront the Taliban and al-Qaida, smash their encrypted online money stream, and win over the hearts and minds of the Afghanistan population.By the end of a full day, White the wunderkind postdoc felt humblingly naive. White had never been privy to the details from a practical, operational perspective.Increasingly, that perspective involved a need to make sense of gargantuan icebergs of raw and seemingly unconnected data, to pull plans and policies out of frozen mountains of intel.If you're new to our site, we also suggest that you take a look at our Chat Room Etiquette page.

Many feared the situation was only going from bad to worse. He had earned academic pole position and had every expectation it would continue that way forever -- becoming a professor, building a lab, and sniping out white papers from a tenured ivory tower.

DARPA projects combined smart people, big ideas, and big government dollars.

Their goal was to help the nation prevent technological surprise, and every five to 10 years, wheel out world-changing tech with a strategic edge.

These apparent contradictions have allowed White, now 34, to bridge worlds between experts.

He's not the genius cranking out code, the analyst looking for the next big IPO, the hand-shaking CEO, or the wartime general turning a pile of intel into a plan.