Racial preference in dating

One possible explanation is structural–this phenomenon could reflect the fact that social interactions are already stratified along racial lines–while another attributes these patterns to individual-level preferences.

We present novel evidence from an online dating community involving more than 250,000 people in the United States about the frequency with which individuals both express a preference for same-race romantic partners and act to choose same-race partners.

It’s a wholesale phenomenon: the ratings for an entire population are shifted down. And science has long known that bonuses accrue to beautiful people: they have better outcomes at work and at school, more success with juries, even live longer lives, and so on.

Q: Are you saying that because I prefer to date [whatever race], I’m a racist? There are many situations that might not be explicitly romantic, but are nonetheless a lot like a first date. In short, “beautiful people” receive a lot of the same built-in benefits in our society that white people do. Beauty is a cultural idea as much as a physical one, and the standard is of course set by the dominant culture. One interesting thing about Ok Cupid’s interface is that we allow people to select more than one race, so you can actually look at people who’ve combined “white” with another racial description. In fact it goes a long way towards undoing any bias against you.

On the other hand, white men responded to black women less often than they did to white, Latino or Asian women.

This ‘dating app’ for investment banking is going places Moreover, the data also revealed that men in general responded to women three times more often as women to them.

Unsurprisingly, most “yes’s” go unanswered, but there are patterns: For example, Asian women responded to white men who “yessed” them 7.8% of the time, more often than they responded to any other race.

On the other hand, white men responded to black women 8.5% of the time—less often than for white, Latino, or Asian women.

In general, we find that stated preferences are a strong predictor of a behavioral preference for same-race partners, and that this pattern persists across ideological groups.In general, men responded to women about three times as often as women responded to men. All men except Asians preferred Asian women, while all except black women preferred white men.And both black men and black women got the lowest response rates for their respective genders.Prior work suggests that political ideology is an important correlate of conservative attitudes about race in the United States, and we find that conservatives, including both men and women and blacks and whites, are much more likely than liberals to state a preference for same-race partners.Further, conservatives are not simply more selective in general; they are specifically selective with regard to race.