Porn sez do cachao Free sex chat from the whole world

spoken, and there would bo no necessity for Pronouncing Dictionaries and Gazetteers, while a disregard of this principle renders the represented language, if not hieroglyphical, at least ideagraphic ; that is, the written or printed word represents an idea, and can not, as a general thing, be considered as repre- senting the sounds of a spoken word.

For example, take the word ccugh, and what relation does either of the.

Even now, in many sections of the West and South, instructors as well as pupils are greatly deficient in this respect ; but the light of the phonetic principle is opening their eyes ; and whether it reach them directly through the phonotypic alpha- bet or by means of Charts of the Elementary sounds, newly arranged spelling books and readers, or some other channel, it matters not, they will soon all ba * Introduction to Phonetic Dictionary, p. In French, its first sound is like a, in arm, (q); its second like the vowel in at, (a), with a circumflex, a, it is sounded very nearly like a, in all (e). In Hungarian, it is like o in not, (o); with an accent, a, like a, in arm, (q). In Danish is sounded like i in ill, (i), at the end of an acoented syllable; in other situations like e in ell, (e), or like ea, in earth, (e). In French, marked thus, e, it is sounded like a in ale, (a); thus, e, like in pear, or ai in air, (a,); thus, e, like e in very, (e), and unmarked, like u in up, (u.) In Dutch and Flemish, similar to the French.

In German, when long, it is like a in ale (a); it is, however, more frequently short like e in met, (e), and sometimes like ea in earth, (e). In Greek, (modern,) it has the sound of a in ale, (a).

The first principle of alphabetic writing or printing was the representation of each sound by a simple character or letter, so that these letters or elemental parts, when combined, would be the counterpart of the spoken word a picture of the word itself.

Such was the Sanscrit, and such, it is evident to every intelligent mind, should be the principle of all alphabetic writing, for thus the acquisition of written or printed language would be as easy cs that of iv INTRODUCTION.

In regard to personal names, so far as the publishers are aware, there has never before been an attempt made to give their pronunciation in an extended list.

[For remarks on the importance of calling men by their right names, see pages 128 9.] But there is another feature of the work here presented, which, in the minds of the publishers and of the many school teachers and friends of education who have examined the subject, is of more value than either of the considerations above mentioned, and demands more than a passing notice.

It is that it gives rise to a slip-shod manner of pronunciation or enunciation. Who that has paid the least attention to the pronunciation of the middle and upper classes, as well as that of public speakers, has not noticed the great want of care, the inaccuracies and diversities prevalent, and particularly how utterly regardless of all rules and taste they are iu the enunciation of unaccented syllables? The words fall from their lips robbed of all their beauty and interest shapeless and repulsive to the educated ear. The methods of representing pronunciation in the ordinary dictionaries and gazetteers, either by marked letters or by figures in connection with them, is so imperfect and Unsatisfactory as to be a constant source of annoyance to all who are necessi- tated to use them. That the reader may understand the full merits of the system of notation employed in this book, we propose to notice briefly some of the circumstances that call for its introduction.