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Criticism of Facebook relates to how Facebook's market dominance have led to international media coverage and significant reporting of its shortcomings.

Notable issues include Internet privacy, such as its use of a widespread "like" button on third-party websites tracking users, with its most prominent case concerning allegations that CEO Mark Zuckerberg broke an oral contract with Cameron Winklevoss, Tyler Winklevoss, and Divya Narendra to build the then-named "Harvard Connection" social network in 2004, instead allegedly opting to steal the idea and code to launch Facebook months before Harvard Connection began.

On June 7, 2000, The Financial Times announced: “Central Nic has launched a global single market in 'com'.” For a decade now, companies from all over the world have used com domains to tell the world that they are open for business in Europe.

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A visitor to the site copied, published and later removed the code from his web forum, claiming he had been served and threatened with legal notice by Facebook.

Facebook treats such relationships as public information, and the user's identity may be displayed on the Facebook page of the product or service.

Instant Personalization was a pilot program which shared Facebook account information with affiliated sites, such as sharing a user's list of "liked" bands with a music website, so that when the user visits the site, their preferred music plays automatically.

Even if you opt out of Instant Personalization, there's still data leakage if your friends use Instant Personalization websites—their activities can give away information about you, unless you block those applications individually." On December 27, 2012, CBS News reported that Randi Zuckerberg, sister of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, criticized a friend for being "way uncool" in sharing a private Facebook photo of her on Twitter, only to be told that the image had appeared on a friend-of-a-friend's Facebook news feed.

Commenting on this misunderstanding of Facebook's privacy settings, Eva Galperin of the EFF said "Even Randi Zuckerberg can get it wrong.